NoBeeMV
no bee
no bee
 

 

 

Tickled pink.
– Out of the Blue

 

Paperback: $8.95
978-0-9832904-1-4 Amazon BN

 

Hardcover: $15.95
978-0-9832904-2-1 Amazon

BN

Author:
Vanita Oelschlager
Illustrator:
Robin Hegan

Ages 4-10
32 Pages

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Goodreads

February, 2013

 

My wife worked with Deaf children and she thought it would be a great tool for abstract thought; due to the visual and mostly literal nature of American Sign Language, many Deaf children comprehend idioms a little later than their hearing peers. The visual aids, although not always consistent, are good enough to facilitate a humorous understanding of these concepts.

My only issue with Out of the Blue is that it doesn't contain more idioms, and those that are better known than the ones shown.

 

 

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Amazon / Goodreads

February, 2013

 

Adorable book of idioms! Great illustrations. I loved the clever art that accompanied the color idioms. A fun book my niece loves reading with me! Very cute and easy to read for the age.

 


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Goodreads

February, 2013

 

Idioms 101. Out of the Blue is support for figurative language play, perfect for ESOL students especially. The brightly illustrated pictures make the grey area of idioms fun.

 


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Perfect Chaos

Stacie Wyatt

January, 2013

 

I read Out of the Blue by Vanita Oelschlager, in exchange for honest review from Netgalley. The book was published by Vanita Books, LLC. The book was illustrated by Robin Hegan.

 

Vanita described color idioms such as ticked pink and green with envy. Each page also had wonderful, vibrant graphics. The author also explained what each idiom means, in small print, in the corners of each page. The last page also explains what idioms are (probably should have been the first page). The book was a quick read. Enjoyed it.



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Kid Lit Reviews

July, 2012

 

Out of the Blue helps young children understand the concept of idioms. Idioms are words that have one obvious meaning, but can also describe something much different. The actual word will usually not help one figure out the meaning. The author uses idioms associated with colors, a basic concept kids understand. For example, the first color used in the book is green. Green can also describe envy. If you feel jealous of what someone else has, you are green with envy. When Billy sees my new skateboard, he will be green with envy.

There are fifteen examples related to colors. After learning the concept, kids will probably come up with their own version of idioms. Some colors can have two different idioms, making things even more confusing to figure out what someone is trying to say. Using the same color, green, a second idiom describes someone feeling ill. If you feel that you might get sick to your
stomach, you are green around the gills. Riding in a boat in bumpy water, makes me feel green around the gills.


This is a nice book. I like the idea of using just colors as examples. Colors are something kids understand without much heavy thought. This leaves lots of energy for concentrating on the hidden meanings of each color.

The illustrations are great! Illustrating each idiom word or phrase will help kids remember what they have learned. Whenever learning involves more than one sense, the lesson becomes easier to learn and remember.

The author and illustrator have worked together to make a wonderful book explaining idioms. There is an expanded definition of idioms on the last page for the more curious. I think Out of the Blue is a book teachers, (primary, elementary, and home schooling), will find invaluable. Parents, who want to give their children a head start learning words, will also like this book.


Thanks for reading this review. I am tickled pink to have read and reviewed Out of the Blue. This kind of gem, is written only once in a blue moon, and unfortunately, I am green with envy, wishing I were the author.



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Laura's Adventure's in Bookland

July, 2012

 

My son will love this book. He is always asking what phrases like this mean and I have to explain. Now he will know what I mean the next time I say one. I think the pictures that go along with each saying are great too. I am glad the author decided to use pictures that go with the saying itself instead of with the meaning of the saying. Each page has a little text at the bottom with the meaning and a sentence example. The last page has more information for everything and really brakes down the meanings. I recommend this book if you are always saying things like this and you have a younger child. It really is a great way to teach him/her what they all mean.



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Nannette Hawkins

July, 2012

 

Out of the Blue shows children the magic of idioms – words that separately have one meaning, but together take on something entirely different.

Children are curious about words, especially phrases that make them laugh (“Tickled Pink”), sound silly (“Shrinking Violet”) or trigger images that tickle a child’s sense of the absurd (“A Red Letter Day”).

Out of the Blue uses outlandish illustrations of what the words describe literally. The reader then has to guess the “real” meaning of the phrases (which are upside down in the corners of each spread). At the end of the book, the reader is invited to learn more about these figures of speech.


The first book of idioms, Birds of a Feather (2009), dealt with birds, insects or animals. The second, Life is a Bowl Full of Cherries (2011) uses food idioms. Out of the Blue uses color idioms. All three are fun – and instructive.


What a great idea for a children’s book! My daughter is only two and a half, but for an older child who questions everything and has heard a few of these familiar idioms, it’s a fun way to explain them. Out of the Blue is wonderfully illustrated, with a lot of silly pictures. Even as an adult I giggled a little. Even though my daughter isn’t old enough to understand the idioms, this book is a great teaching aid for moms. With my little one I found the book can also be used to teach children about colors, animals, and even counting.


I absolutely love this book! This is one for the family library. I plan on checking out Birds of a Feather, and Life is a Bowl Full of Cherries as well. Great end of summer reads to get those little minds geared up for school.

 

 

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Second Bookshelf on the Right
Marianne Benavidez
April 2, 2012


I enjoyed this book.


Out of the Blue's strength is the hilarious drawings that take idioms literally. There are also explanations for each idiom that are written upside down at the bottom of the page. There's also additional information about idioms at the end of the book.

VanitaBooks donates all net profits to The Oak Clinic for Multiple Sclerosis and other charities where "people help people help themselves."

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